Knowledge Is Your Brand – Part 2: Microblogging

branding by microblogging

The internet has made information, products, situations, and ourselves more accessible. This all-access pass has given consumers the need for transparency to build trust and loyalty. We already know who the CEOs and corporate heads are, now we want to know the employees too. We want to be kept up to date, we want instant news, and we want brand personality. So, allow your business to be what we expect and want — accessible and transparent. Branding by microblogging gives a face and personality to your business, revealing a taste in information, a sense of humor, and an idea of who is it that keeps the business running.

Internet folk are fast-paced, busy people. Thus, not everyone takes the time to read your blog posts or your newsletters. Surfers tend to only take the time to read the first two sentences of your blog post. This is where microblogging is successful — a small sentence, a photo, a sound clip, or a video grabs your attention where a blog may fail. Status updates and multimedia give your customers a sense of life behind your brand. As a consumer it helps you to pick a product or company when you know they have similar views, are from similar locations, have similar individuals backing the brand, and simply have a friendly brand personality.

Brevity is the name of the game. Learn how to say what you need in a sentence or two. A picture can say the 1000 words you can’t. A video does the talking for you. Microblogging is advertising and branding at its perfection — brief yet deep and personal. The trick with microblogs is to do it often but carefully. When you don’t have much to say what you do say makes a deeper impact and influences how your brand is seen on a more personal level.

Microblogging provides the opportunity to creatively present large amounts of information bits. Often, bits of information are much more consumable than blogs. A business with a visual product like a photographer, model, graphic designer, web designer, jewelery maker, antique collector, and more will find websites like flickr.com useful because photos are key to showcasing your work, products, and experience. When your business relies on a large group of customers, websites like Facebook.com and other networks are vital to making connections and updating unique content about business happenings through status updates.

Depending on your specific business you may find you use multiple platforms for your microblogging as well as plastering these consumable bits all over your website. Be sure to not repeat yourself too much. Short bits of information are great unless you see the same information over and over again. Your website, and your accounts on flickr, Facebook, Tumblr, Foursquare, and YouTube (to name a few) all offer different types information and in turn, a different internet community, giving you the opportunity for your business to become a valuable brand to each unique community. Keeping content unique to each platform will allow followers and fans to keep up on activity on a variety of networks without receiving repetitive content. People want to choose a brand they believe in an identify with.

The goal of microblogging is to inform as may people as possible of the information that makes your business valuable in an accessible and easy form while building a sense of personality for your brand.  When your business is liked, respected, and relied on for different and entertaining content you are well on your way to securing your place as an essential brand because knowledge is your brand.